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By 7010290010 01 Jun, 2017

As a follow-up to Casey's last blog I just wanted to talk a little about sitting and chronic neck pain.

A lot of us have recurrent headaches that feel like they could be migraines and when we ask around about other people having headaches we get the idea that a lot of people have "migraines." Don't get me wrong...there are a number of people out there that have legitimate migraines and they should be treated as such, but I would bet that most of us are having severe tension headaches. Especially those of us that do a lot of sitting at computers, looking down while working or handling our small children for several hours a day with very little relief.

A tension headache can feel a lot like a migraine with symptoms like light sensitivity, dizziness, blurred vision, etc but it's actually coming from the over tired, over tight and weak muscles in our neck.

So how do you know if it's tension? The best way to know is by removing the tension and see if it the pain decreases. Try some exercises that reverse your computer posture and forward head and rounded shoulders. Get up and walk around a bit and do something different. If it helps even a little it's likely tension. The next thing to do is find some tricks that help you personally reduce your pain. Everybody is a little different and the same thing doesn't always work for all of us, especially when the condition is chronic. Some of us need exercises like chin tucks and shoulder retraction; some of need stretches for our necks and chest; and some of us need some self trigger point release. We all have to find our own prescription and stick with it.

I guess the point is that life likes to throw us pains and hardships that become part of us and the best thing to do is figure out how to manage them. Its what makes us...us.

By 7010290010 17 May, 2017
My name is Casey Colyar. I'm a physical therapist for Performance Physical Therapy. I work out of the Lehi clinic. I want to just briefly share a thought that I came across that was originally presented by Mike Reinold, a physical therapist out of Boston, Mass. That is, is sitting really bad for you? Up to that point, I had a mixed opinion on it, but had a hard time articualitng how I felt. When I read his blog post (which you can find at:  https://mikereinold.com/sitting-isnt-bad-for-you/ ), it really hit home to me and drove home a number of points that I felt matched my feelings.

Sitting isn't necessarily bad for you, but not moving is what is can be bad and detrimental. 

So what do we do about it? In his blog post, Mike explains three ways to combat the effects of not moving within a seated position. I'll briefly touch on them.

1: Move. This is the most simple way to combat not moving. It can be as simple as switching and moving position in your chair to getting up and filling up the water bottle. Whatever it is you choose, be sure to move.
2: Reverse you posture: There are muscles that tissues that get tight vs weak when in a seated position for too long. There are various stretches and strengthening  exercises that can be done to help negate the effects of sitting. Mike's article has some great videos on ways to do this.
3: Exercise: This is an important thing to do for anyone, and especially for those who sit for long periods. Don't worry about doing anything crazy, even a simple walking program is a great place to start. 

Performance Physical Therapy Blog

By 7010290010 01 Jun, 2017

As a follow-up to Casey's last blog I just wanted to talk a little about sitting and chronic neck pain.

A lot of us have recurrent headaches that feel like they could be migraines and when we ask around about other people having headaches we get the idea that a lot of people have "migraines." Don't get me wrong...there are a number of people out there that have legitimate migraines and they should be treated as such, but I would bet that most of us are having severe tension headaches. Especially those of us that do a lot of sitting at computers, looking down while working or handling our small children for several hours a day with very little relief.

A tension headache can feel a lot like a migraine with symptoms like light sensitivity, dizziness, blurred vision, etc but it's actually coming from the over tired, over tight and weak muscles in our neck.

So how do you know if it's tension? The best way to know is by removing the tension and see if it the pain decreases. Try some exercises that reverse your computer posture and forward head and rounded shoulders. Get up and walk around a bit and do something different. If it helps even a little it's likely tension. The next thing to do is find some tricks that help you personally reduce your pain. Everybody is a little different and the same thing doesn't always work for all of us, especially when the condition is chronic. Some of us need exercises like chin tucks and shoulder retraction; some of need stretches for our necks and chest; and some of us need some self trigger point release. We all have to find our own prescription and stick with it.

I guess the point is that life likes to throw us pains and hardships that become part of us and the best thing to do is figure out how to manage them. Its what makes us...us.

By 7010290010 17 May, 2017
My name is Casey Colyar. I'm a physical therapist for Performance Physical Therapy. I work out of the Lehi clinic. I want to just briefly share a thought that I came across that was originally presented by Mike Reinold, a physical therapist out of Boston, Mass. That is, is sitting really bad for you? Up to that point, I had a mixed opinion on it, but had a hard time articualitng how I felt. When I read his blog post (which you can find at:  https://mikereinold.com/sitting-isnt-bad-for-you/ ), it really hit home to me and drove home a number of points that I felt matched my feelings.

Sitting isn't necessarily bad for you, but not moving is what is can be bad and detrimental. 

So what do we do about it? In his blog post, Mike explains three ways to combat the effects of not moving within a seated position. I'll briefly touch on them.

1: Move. This is the most simple way to combat not moving. It can be as simple as switching and moving position in your chair to getting up and filling up the water bottle. Whatever it is you choose, be sure to move.
2: Reverse you posture: There are muscles that tissues that get tight vs weak when in a seated position for too long. There are various stretches and strengthening  exercises that can be done to help negate the effects of sitting. Mike's article has some great videos on ways to do this.
3: Exercise: This is an important thing to do for anyone, and especially for those who sit for long periods. Don't worry about doing anything crazy, even a simple walking program is a great place to start. 
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